Dignity Therapy: For The Dying, A Chance To Rewrite Life : NPR

Dignity Therapy: For The Dying, A Chance To Rewrite Life : NPR.

One of the important pieces of working with the dying is to give them or their families an opportunity to rethink and relay their lives to others.  We are afraid that we will not have a legacy, and as such, some of our fear of death could potentially be alleviated through reflection and story telling.  There is a formal methodology for this, which is called dignity therapy.  Unfortunately, for many, reflection comes too late because of other concerns getting in the way, such as the fear of telling the person the truth because if someone knows he is dying, the person will get very depressed.  Instead, dignity therapy is a means of working through the depression to find a place of meaning that will outlast one’s life. 

For several decades, psychiatrists who work with the dying have been trying to come up with new psychotherapies that can help people cope with the reality of their death. One of these therapies asks the dying to tell the story of their life.

This end-of-life treatment, called dignity therapy, was created by a man named Harvey Chochinov. When Chochinov was a young psychiatrist working with the dying, he had a powerful experience with one of the patients he was trying to counsel — a man with an inoperable brain tumor.

“One of the last times that I went into his room to meet with him, on his bedside table was a photograph of him when he had indeed been young and healthy and a bodybuilder, and it was this incredible juxtaposition of these two images,” says Chochinov.

So in the bed there’s his patient — this skeleton of a man — very pale and weak. On the bedside table, there’s this portrait of a glistening, muscled giant. And Chochinov says that sitting there, it was very clear to him that by placing this photograph in such a prominent position, the man was sending a message: This was how he needed to be seen.

As Chochinov continued his work with the dying, he confronted this again and again — this need people have to assert themselves in the face of death. And he started to wonder about it…

“When you face death, it’s like facing a wall, and it forces you to turn around and look at the life that you’ve lived,” says William Breitbart, a psychiatrist at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He’s been trying to develop new psychotherapies for the dying. He says that many people have the wrong idea about the dying process.

“The prevailing mythology is that you die the way you live, and you can’t change yourself in any way,” says Breitbart. “The fact is that the last few months of life — because of the awareness of death — create an urgency that facilitates growth and change.”

This, he says, is why something like dignity therapy can be good. Though there’s no evidence that it relieves depression or anxiety, he thinks it can help us change in the very last moment of our lives. After all, he says, we’ve all lived imperfect lives.

“All of us fail, and the process, the task of dying, is to relieve ourselves of this guilt, whether it’s forgiving yourself or asking others to forgive you,” says Breitbart. “Or to remember your life slightly differently. But that’s the task of dying.”

As for Frego, she says she’s developed a strange relationship to the document her mother put together. Since her mother’s death, Frego says she’s actually carried the document around with her. She has the story of her mother’s life, always at her side, knocking around in the bottom of her bag.

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